Here’s The Low-Down On The Fashion Shows Happening Post-Lockdown | British Vogue

I would be lying if I said I wasn’t experiencing a bit of an identity crisis during this global pandemic. How does a style blogger and product junkie write about beauty and fashion when isolation is strongly encouraged and there’s nowhere to go? Where would I wear a yellow lace dress? Or a corset swimsuit? Why wear makeup if half of my face is covered and it’s just going to come off on the mask and create skin problems?

Until recently, I felt the idea of fashion shows was nothing short of sadistic; they were just a reminder of places I couldn’t go without the constant worry of catching COVID-19, or having my great mood stifled by the reality of temperature checks, discouraged socializing, or the lack of money to shop. I’m living in robes and sweats, so while I’m not an athleisure girl, I see the appeal now.

Apparently, my issues are poor peoples’ problems because fashion shows are still going on, albeit digitally, and Vogue is here to break down every show as they come in. 

Dreaming is still free…

Source: Here’s The Low-Down On The Fashion Shows Happening Post-Lockdown | British Vogue

Holly Burn Spoofs Vogue’s 73 Questions With Victoria Beckham

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Last week I wrote a couple of posts about Victoria Beckham (I guess last week was unintentionally all about Victoria Beckham) and one of the mentions was in my weekly newsletter “News From The Beautiverse” about her stint on Vogue’s 73 Questions series. British comedian, actor, and writer Holly Burn decided to spoof it (somebody had to) and it is absolutely hilarious. See for yourself.

 

73 Questions with Victoria Beckham Vogue – Spoof:

 

Victoria had no problem with this is as she posted it on her twitter account. She obviously has a sense of humor and I am sure she is smiling on the inside. Here is the original version.

 

73 Questions with Victoria Beckham:

 

Tell me what you think about both versions in the comment section and see what else Mrs. David Beckham is up to.

Vogue: Carey Mulligan – Great Expectations

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Photo Credit: Mario Testino – Oscar de la Renta Dress. Jewels by Tiffany & Co.
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Photo Credit: Mario Testino – Dior Haute Couture top, sautoir from Stephen Russell, and bracelets from Gray & Davis, Ltf. Headpiece created by Julien d’Ys.
Photo Credit: Mario Testino – RARE BLOOM -Chanel Haute Couture sequined dress. Necklace from the Three Graces with enamel portraits (worn as headband). Lorraine Schwartz earrings. Diamond ring from De Vera.

It’s like she’s living in a movie of her own life,” says Mulligan of Daisy. “She’s constantly on show.”

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Photo Credit: Mario Testino – Alexander McQueen ostrich feather dress with chiffon-covered pearls. Tiffany & Co. earrings. Miu Miu jeweled heels. Fred Leighton bag.
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Photo Credit: Mario Testino – Nina Ricci silk-satin dress with flower appliqués. Chanel Fine Jewelry diamond-and-onyx earrings. Bracelet from Gray & Davis, Ltd.

See the behind the scene video of the Great Expectations Cover Shoot

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Photo Credit: Mario Testino – Oscar de la Renta beaded silk organza top and matching skirt.
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Photo Credit: Mario Testino -Chanel Haute Couture chiffon, feather, and tulle dress with flouncing open shoulders. Twenties headband from New York Vintage.
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Photo Credit: Mario Testino – Miu Miu dress, embroidered with Swarovski Elements, and heels.

Great Expectations: The Inimitable Carey Mulligan | Vogue.com

Set design: Mary Howard.

Produced by: GE Projects.

Costume Designer: Catherine Martin

Makeup: Mark Carrasquillo.

Hair and Headpieces: Julien d’Ys.

Fashion Editor: Grace Coddington

Photographed by Mario Testino

Beyoncé Hits the Ground Ruling: Mrs. Carter in H&M Amidst Bow Down Controversy

Is it me or does it look like Beyoncé is taking over? In what could be the trendy retailers biggest celebrity endorsement yet, H&M has managed to snap up Queen Bey as the new face of  H&M. A summer collection is set to roll out globally in May captioned, “Beyoncé as Mrs. Carter in H&M” and from the looks of the promotional photo, it will be a red hot campaign. Her ensemble is seasonably sexy as she lounges in a revealing white sleeveless blouse, teeny black and white printed shorts, multiple gold bangles, and stilettos. Beyoncé undoubtedly had a hand in designing the line so it’s sure to be inclusive of all sizes.

Just a few days earlier, she announced her upcoming tour, “The Mrs. Carter Show” so it looks like the collection will tie into the world tour. Her new song, Standing on the Sun, will feature in the television and online advertisements for H&M, and I Been On, the second part of Bow Down/I Been On, is the featured music for O2 Priority tickets for the UK leg of the tour, which starts in Serbia, Belgrade, April 15.

After taking some time off to enjoy life and Blue Ivy, Beyoncé has crammed a lot into the first few months of 2013;  the Super Bowl performance, her recent Shape, GQ (GQ named her “Miss Millennium”), and Vogue magazine covers, a world tour, her fifth album, and clothing line. All of this is coming on the heels of her HBO documentary Life Is But A Dream, and her $50 million endorsement deal with Pepsi. (Did I leave anything out?) Add to that the President and Michelle Obama’s obvious affection for her and Jay Z, and it spells world domination to me.

 All of that exposure and power can’t come without some controversy and this time it’s behind the lyrics for Bow Down, which some say comes off as disdain, not just to her haters, but to her fans as well. R&B songstress Keisha Cole and others have voiced their opinions and confusion over the lyrics because her songs are typically pro-woman and these lyrics are not. When you look at the numerous awards, album sales, and accolades, there has already been a fair amount of bowing down. After all, she is called “Queen Bey” for a reason.

There is nothing wrong with a healthy self image, and if she were a man, there would be no controversy. In any event, this isn’t going to affect clothing, album or ticket sales; in fact, it will probably increase them. Not that I know her, but anytime I have seen Beyoncé in interviews, she appears to be very approachable and grounded, despite her massive popularity and wealth. I am going to assume that there is a method to the Bow Down madness and Mrs Carter is another incarnation, like Sasha Fierce.

Forget the lyrics, I just want to know where she gets her energy from. I probably can’t afford it, but I want to know just the same so I can start saving up. Just writing about what she has accomplished and has planned for this year makes me want a nap.

Do you find the Bow Down lyrics offensive? Are you excited about the “Beyoncé as Mrs. Carter in H&M,” collection?